Many Are Cold, but Few Are Frozen

David Lawrence's personal blog

Life in the Ger Districts

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Bayangol District, Ulaanbaatar

Yesterday I went to a ger district on the outskirts of Ulaanbaatar to take pictures for the World Bank's East Asia & Pacific Blog. A friend of mine, Gerelchimeg (who is my favorite waitress in the coffee shop at the Grand Khan Irish Pub) took me there and showed me around. She also made me a nice lunch of eggs, fish, and black bread.

Life is difficult in the ger districts. There is no piped water or sanitation, and few paved roads. People have to buy their water in water kiosks and carry it long distances to their homes. They burn wood or coal for cooking and heating, which leads to terrible winter pollution. I hope to increase awareness of this problem in the hopes that more will be done to tackle it.

You can read the full post at this link: Mongolia's growing shantytowns.